Exodus Chapter 29 Preface

This chapter introduces us to several themes that are developed in much greater detail in other places, especially the book of Leviticus.   

This chapter introduces us to seven Old Testament sacrifices or offerings that all point us to the work of Jesus Christ.  These sacrifices are as follows: 

                   1.  Sin offering

                   2.  Burnt offering

                   3.  Peace offering

                   4.  Meat offering

                   5.  Drink offering

                   6.  Wave offering

                   7.  Heave offering. 

This chapter also introduces us to the use of the words: consecrate; hallow; and sanctify.  While all three terms have similar meanings, yet, there are some differences between the Hebrew words used for consecrate and the Hebrew words used for hallow or sanctify.  The words, hallow and sanctify, come from the same Hebrew word and carry the connotation of cleansing for a holy use.  Whereas, the Hebrew words for consecrate carries the idea of a complete preparation and setting apart for a holy use.         

Additionally, we are introduced to the morning and the evening sacrifice that was to be carried out and observed by the children of Israel into perpetuity.   

There are five animals used in the sacrifices or offerings that God gave unto the children of Israel.  These are as follows:

                   a. Cattle

                   b. Goats

                   c. Sheep

                   d. Dove or Pigeon

                   e. Turtle Dove. 

The bullock is a beast of labor.  The bullock in the offerings was symbolic of the labors of Christ who was offered for our sins and accepted of God. 

Goats represent Godís eternal judgment of sin.

Sheep are frequently used to represent Godís elect people.

The turtledove is often referred to as the love bird as the male and female have been often observed paired in a nestled position.

The words, dove or pigeon, appear 42 times in the scripture.  The number 42 is associated with Godís covenants.  Thus, the dove or pigeon is representative of the Lordís covenant people or church. 

The shoulder is associated throughout the scriptures with the carrying of burdens.  The heave offering is always associated with the shoulder. 

The breast is associated mostly with the wave offering.  Otherwise it is associated with intimacy and nurturing. 


Verses 1-4

:1 ďAnd this is the thing that thou shalt do unto them to hallow them, to minister unto me in the priest's office: Take one young bullock, and two rams without blemish, 2 And unleavened bread, and cakes unleavened tempered with oil, and wafers unleavened anointed with oil: of wheaten flour shalt thou make them. 3 And thou shalt put them into one basket, and bring them in the basket, with the bullock and the two rams. 4 And Aaron and his sons thou shalt bring unto the door of the tabernacle of the congregation, and shalt wash them with water.Ē 

 ďTake one young bullock, and two rams without blemish,Ē This introduces us to the principle of animal sacrifice that points us to the sacrificial atonement of Jesus Christ.  In the scriptures, the bullock or cattle are used as beast of burden.  The bullock calls us to the work of Christ and the burden that he carried.  Rams or sheep are used typically as a representation of Godís covenant people.  This points us to the fact that Christ came as a representative of Godís covenant people to save them from their sins.   

ďAnd unleavened bread, and cakes unleavened tempered with oil, and wafers unleavened anointed with oil: of wheaten flour shalt thou make them.Ē  Unleavened bread is to be distinguished in the scriptures from bread that is leavened.  Leaven represents things such as false doctrine, pride, wickedness, malice, and sin.  That, which is unleavened, represents sincerity and truth and purity.  The Lord used unleavened bread in the communion service to represent his pure sinless body.   

Kings and High Priests were anointed with oil.  This teaches us in type that Christ not only came to save his people from their sins, but also to reign as King in the kingdom of God and High Priest after the order of Melchisedec for his people. 

ďAnd thou shalt put them into one basket, and bring them in the basket, with the bullock and the two rams. 4 And Aaron and his sons thou shalt bring unto the door of the tabernacle of the congregation, and shalt wash them with water.Ē  We note in this passage that which is to be used in sacrifice is also tied together with a washing.   

The washing of Aaron and his sons was done to them.  Later they will do some washing.  This is significant in that the children of God are first washed by God in the washing of regeneration and afterwards they are taught that they are to do some personal cleaning in their own lives.  The washing of regeneration cleanses us from our sins and the cleansing we are to do, cleans our walk of discipleship. 

Likewise to our subject passage, Christ sacrificially atoned for our sins at the cross of Calvary.  Moreover, this work of atonement is applied to us in the washing of regeneration by the Holy Ghost.  This ties together justification and the effectual calling of God in regeneration or new birth. 


Verses 5-9 

:5 And thou shalt take the garments, and put upon Aaron the coat, and the robe of the ephod, and the ephod, and the breastplate, and gird him with the curious girdle of the ephod: 6 And thou shalt put the mitre upon his head, and put the holy crown upon the mitre. 7 Then shalt thou take the anointing oil, and pour it upon his head, and anoint him. 8 And thou shalt bring his sons, and put coats upon them. 9 And thou shalt gird them with girdles, Aaron and his sons, and put the bonnets on them: and the priest's office shall be theirs for a perpetual statute: and thou shalt consecrate Aaron and his sons.Ē 

Verses 5-7 teaches us that the High Priest had to have the proper garments on and be anointed with the anointing oil before he could be set apart to minister in his office.  All of the garments as we studied in chapter 28 pointed us to the person and work of Jesus Christ and all his holy attributes, we see the necessity that Christ be perfectly clothed with all these things those garments pointed to in order to serve as the High Priest after the order of Melchisidec.   

Verses 8 and 9 teach us that the sons of Aaron had also to be clothed with the appointed garments in order to minister in their office.  In comparison, we as children of God must be clothed with the imputed righteousness of Jesus Christ and be clothed with humility in order to minister unto the Lordís people as his disciples.