The Fall of Adam and Eve in the Garden 

         Gen. 3:1 "Now the serpent was more subtle than any beast of the field which the LORD God had made. And he said unto the woman, Yea, hath God said, Ye shall not eat of every tree of the garden? 2 And the woman said unto the serpent, We may eat of the fruit of the trees of the garden: 3 But of the fruit of the tree which is in the midst of the garden, God hath said, Ye shall not eat of it, neither shall ye touch it, lest ye die. 4 And the serpent said unto the woman, Ye shall not surely die: 5 For God doth know that in the day ye eat thereof, then your eyes shall be opened, and ye shall be as gods, knowing good and evil. 6 And when the woman saw that the tree was good for food, and that it was pleasant to the eyes, and a tree to be desired to make one wise, she took of the fruit thereof, and did eat, and gave also unto her husband with her; and he did eat."

            The serpent was the creature that enticed the woman and subsequently the man to eat of the forbidden fruit and so fall in trespasses and sins.  In Revelations chapters 12 and 20 the serpent is identified for us:

      1.  Rev. 12:9 "And the great dragon was cast out, that old serpent, called the Devil, and Satan, which deceiveth the whole world: he was cast out into the earth, and his angels were cast out with him."

     2.  Rev. 20:2 "And he laid hold on the dragon, that old serpent, which is the Devil, and Satan, and bound him a thousand years." 

            Thus, we conclude that the serpent in the garden is none other than the Devil or Satan who had taken up residence in the body of the serpent.

            When the above passage speaks of the subtlety of the serpent it is talking about the subtlety of Satan.  The word, subtle, comes from a Hebrew word meaning "cunning or crafty."  We notice the devices of the serpent:

     1.  He went to the weakest link.  Eve was the weakest link because she had not been an eyewitness of what God had said to Adam.  She was still a rib in Adam's side when God gave the law of sin and death to Adam.  What Eve knew, she knew, because of what Adam had said to her.  Also, we notice that Adam did not tell Eve the exact same thing that God had told Adam.  Based on Eve's response to the serpent, she thought that God had said "We may eat of the fruit of the trees of the garden: But of the fruit of the tree which is in the midst of the garden, God hath said, Ye shall not eat of it, neither shall ye touch it, lest ye die."  Thus, it would appear that Adam had told Eve that she was not to eat of the tree or even touch it, lest ye die. 

     2.  The serpent called in question the veracity of the word of God when he asked, "Ye hath God said, Ye shall not eat of every tree of the garden?"  He is questioning what God had said.  Likewise, Satan in tempting Christ in the wilderness said, "If thou be the Son of Godů"  Again, Satan is calling in question the Sonship of Jesus Christ.  In doing so, he was questioning the truthfulness of God who said that Christ was his son. 

     3.  Next, the serpent contradicted the word of God.  As the Lord said, the devil was a liar from the beginning and the father of liars.  Satan said, "Ye shall not surely die:" God had said that "in the day thou eatest thereof thou shalt surely die."  Satan said, "Ye shall not surely die."  Thus, Satan is questioning the truthfulness of God and setting himself up as being greater than God. 

     4.  Moreover, the serpent sets forth the enticement to work on the desires of the flesh: "For God doth know that in the day ye eat thereof, then your eyes shall be opened, and ye shall be as gods, knowing good and evil."  Now the enticement is that if you eat of the tree then your eyes will be opened and you will become godlike and know good and evil."  This fits the principle set forth in the book of James: James 1:13 "Let no man say when he is tempted, I am tempted of God: for God cannot be tempted with evil, neither tempteth he any man: 14 But every man is tempted, when he is drawn away of his own lust, and enticed. 15 Then when lust hath conceived, it bringeth forth sin: and sin, when it is finished, bringeth forth death."  Notice the serpent provided the enticement to the lust of the flesh.  Before sin is brought forth and then death, the enticement must conceive with the lust (desires of the flesh). 

      5.  Man was created with three types of fleshly desires.  The desires in and of themselves are not sinful.  Sin is brought forth when the fleshly desires conceive with the enticement to evil.  We read of these three fleshly desires in 1 John 2:16 "For all that is in the world, the lust of the flesh, and the lust of the eyes, and the pride of life, is not of the Father, but is of the world."  Notice that when Eve looked at the tree of knowledge of good and evil she saw: "that the tree was good for food (lust of the flesh), and that it was pleasant to the eyes (lust of the eyes), and a tree to be desired to make one wise (pride of life). 

     6.  When the enticement of Satan conceived in the mind of Eve with the lust of her flesh she ate of the tree (sin) and this sin brought forth death.

     7.  The fallen one (Eve) now becomes the serpent's instrument to entice the as yet unfallen man (Adam):  Eve having eaten of the forbidden fruit "then gave also to her husband with her; and he did eat." 

            There was a major difference between the sin of Eve and the sin of Adam.  Eve was deceived in her fall, yet Adam was not deceived.  He knew exactly what God had said and the consequences of his actions, yet he did it anyway.  Adam was left with an alternative choice when he saw that Eve had eaten of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil.  The choice was either to obey God and be separated from his wife or disobey God and die but not be separated from his wife.  Adam chose the later. 


God as the Apprehender and Judge of the Sinner 

            Gen. 3:8 "And they heard the voice of the LORD God walking in the garden in the cool of the day: and Adam and his wife hid themselves from the presence of the LORD God amongst the trees of the garden. 9 And the LORD God called unto Adam, and said unto him, Where art thou? 10 And he said, I heard thy voice in the garden, and I was afraid, because I was naked; and I hid myself. 11 And he said, Who told thee that thou wast naked? Hast thou eaten of the tree, whereof I commanded thee that thou shouldest not eat? 12 And the man said, The woman whom thou gavest to be with me, she gave me of the tree, and I did eat.

            13 And the LORD God said unto the woman, What is this that thou hast done? And the woman said, The serpent beguiled me, and I did eat.

            14 And the LORD God said unto the serpent, Because thou hast done this, thou art cursed above all cattle, and above every beast of the field; upon thy belly shalt thou go, and dust shalt thou eat all the days of thy life: 15 And I will put enmity between thee and the woman, and between thy seed and her seed; it shall bruise thy head, and thou shalt bruise his heel.

            16 Unto the woman he said, I will greatly multiply thy sorrow and thy conception; in sorrow thou shalt bring forth children; and thy desire shall be to thy husband, and he shall rule over thee.

            17 And unto Adam he said, Because thou hast hearkened unto the voice of thy wife, and hast eaten of the tree, of which I commanded thee, saying, Thou shalt not eat of it: cursed is the ground for thy sake; in sorrow shalt thou eat of it all the days of thy life; 18 Thorns also and thistles shall it bring forth to thee; and thou shalt eat the herb of the field; 19 In the sweat of thy face shalt thou eat bread, till thou return unto the ground; for out of it wast thou taken: for dust thou art, and unto dust shalt thou return."

            None is more perfect than God to bring the sinner to the bar of justice.  According to the scriptures:

     1.  Heb. 4:12 "For the word of God is quick, and powerful, and sharper than any twoedged sword, piercing even to the dividing asunder of soul and spirit, and of the joints and marrow, and is a discerner of the thoughts and intents of the heart. 13 Neither is there any creature that is not manifest in his sight: but all things are naked and opened unto the eyes of him with whom we have to do."

     2.  Ps. 139:2 "Thou knowest my downsitting and mine uprising, thou understandest my thought afar off. 3 Thou compassest my path and my lying down, and art acquainted with all my ways. 4 For there is not a word in my tongue, but, lo, O LORD, thou knowest it altogether. 5 Thou hast beset me behind and before, and laid thine hand upon me. 6 Such knowledge is too wonderful for me; it is high, I cannot attain unto it. 7 Whither shall I go from thy spirit? or whither shall I flee from thy presence? 8 If I ascend up into heaven, thou art there: if I make my bed in hell, behold, thou art there. 9 If I take the wings of the morning, and dwell in the uttermost parts of the sea; 10 Even there shall thy hand lead me, and thy right hand shall hold me."

            The above passages of scripture teach us of the omniscience of God (He has all knowledge of all things) and the omnipresence of God.  His omniscience and omnipresence make God the perfect apprehender of the sinner.  There is no such thing as anyone ever getting away with a single sin before God.  All sin and disobedience receives a just recompense of reward. 

            When God called unto Adam and asked him, "where art thou?" it wasn't that God did not know where Adam was, for God knew perfectly well where Adam was and what he had done.  No, this was bringing Adam before the bar of judgment in the courtroom of the Almighty and charging him with sin.  Adam had no choice but to confess his sin.  His own words condemned him: "I heard thy voice in the garden, and I was afraid, because I was naked; and I hid myself."  Why was Adam afraid?  Why did he know that he was naked?  Why did he hide himself?  If Adam had not sinned he had no reason to be afraid.  He had no reason to hide himself.  He had no reason to be ashamed of his nakedness.  When standing before the Almighty judge of all the earth, the sinner will confess his sins. 

            God's response to Adam's confession was: "Who told thee that thou wast naked? Hast thou eaten of the tree, whereof I commanded thee that thou shouldest not eat?"  God already knew the answer, but for Adam's sake he asked the question.  Adam would not have known of the shame of sin had he not eaten of the tree of knowledge of good and evil.  With Adam's reply we see the fallen nature of sinful man as he attempted to shift the blame for his sin to someone else: "The woman whom thou gavest to be with me, she gave me of the tree, and I did eat."  In other words, it was the woman's fault and ultimately it was God's fault because he game me the woman!  Fallen man always attempts to shift the blame for sin to someone else. 

            Next, God accosts the woman: "What is this that thou hast done?"  Again, we know that God knew perfectly well what the woman had done, but he brings forth a confession from the woman: "The serpent beguiled me, and I did eat."  The blame game continues.  The woman says it was the serpents fault because he beguiled her.  While it is true that the serpent beguiled her, yet she was ultimately responsible for her actions.  Likewise, we are ultimately responsible for our actions.

            Now, we know that God did not ask the serpent why he beguiled the woman.  There was no excuse for the serpent's action.  It was strictly Satan's rebellion against God. 

            "And the LORD God said unto the serpent, Because thou hast done this, thou art cursed above all cattle, and above every beast of the field; upon thy belly shalt thou go, and dust shalt thou eat all the days of thy life: 15 And I will put enmity between thee and the woman, and between thy seed and her seed; it shall bruise thy head, and thou shalt bruise his heel."  Here as God pronounces judgment upon the serpent, he also makes a promise of a redeemer for his fallen family.  This is the promise of the woman's seed bruising the head of the serpent, while the woman's seed would have his heel bruised.  Implied in this was the virgin birth of the Lord Jesus Christ (woman's seed) and the death of Jesus upon the cross (heel bruised), while destroying the works of the devil (head of the serpent). 

             Moreover, God pronounced judgment upon Eve: "Unto the woman he said, I will greatly multiply thy sorrow and thy conception; in sorrow thou shalt bring forth children; and thy desire shall be to thy husband, and he shall rule over thee."  This pronouncement had a local fulfillment in Eve and a long term pronouncement upon women in general.  Any woman who has ever given birth to a child knows that the birth comes with much sorrow or pain.  With every birth, a woman comes perilously close to death to deliver a child into the world.  Many women have died giving child birth.  Further, despite the desires of some women in the women's liberation movement, the fact is that the wives of the world have had the husbands of the world to have authority or rule over them. 

            One part of the pronouncement seems to be peculiar to Eve.  God promised he would greatly multiply her conception.  Notice that he did not say he would greatly multiply her conception(s), i.e., that she would have more than one conception.  That is not at all unusual for women to have more than one conception.  The promise was that he would greatly multiply her conception, singular.  In other words, with each conception she would bring forth multiple children.  Most women do not have multiple children with each conception.  However, Eve is the mother of all living and with each delivery she had more than one child.  This would explain, biblically, where the wives for Cain and Seth came from.  They were their sisters perhaps their twin sisters. 

            Finally, God pronounced judgment upon Adam: "And unto Adam he said, Because thou hast hearkened unto the voice of thy wife, and hast eaten of the tree, of which I commanded thee, saying, Thou shalt not eat of it: cursed is the ground for thy sake; in sorrow shalt thou eat of it all the days of thy life; 18 Thorns also and thistles shall it bring forth to thee; and thou shalt eat the herb of the field; 19 In the sweat of thy face shalt thou eat bread, till thou return unto the ground; for out of it wast thou taken: for dust thou art, and unto dust shalt thou return."  The ground was cursed for Adam's sake.  Adam and all mankind were sentenced to hard work to produce the fruits of their survival.  Further, man was consigned to return to the dust of the earth.  Now we know that this is not all of God's judgment as we have more unveiled to us as we continue the study of the scriptures.  However, we can see that the nature of man changed in the fall and that he became dead in trespasses and sins and he was judged by God to return unto the ground at corporeal death.


The immediate evidences of the fallen state of man 

            Gen. 3:7 "And the eyes of them both were opened, and they knew that they were naked; and they sewed fig leaves together, and made themselves aprons. 8 And they heard the voice of the LORD God walking in the garden in the cool of the day: and Adam and his wife hid themselves from the presence of the LORD God amongst the trees of the garden." 

            First, the serpents lie is manifest.  While some of what the serpent said was true, the eyes of Adam and Eve were opened and they knew evil, yet the rest of what he said was immediately manifest to be a lie.  They did not become as God and they did not know good.  They knew only evil. 

            Second, their state or condition of life became immediately dead in trespasses and sins.  The evidences of their fallen state are manifest in the above passage:

                        1.  They noticed immediately that they were naked and were ashamed.  Before they fell in sin, they were naked, but they were not ashamed because in their innocent state nakedness brought no shame to them. 

                        2.  Their fallen state is manifest by the fact that they thought they could do something about the shame of their sin: "They sewed fig leaves together, and made themselves aprons" to hide the shame of their sin.  Thus, they tried to fool themselves and God into believing they could take care of their sin problem. 

                        3.  Their fallen state was further manifest in that they thought they could hide from God: "and Adam and his wife hid themselves from the presence of the LORD God amongst the trees of the garden."  This teaches us that they thought that God would not be able to see them among the tress of the garden and that they could escape the judgment of God through hiding themselves.  Their wicked minds were completely clouded by sin.